Facebook’s New Media DNA

Credit: James Duncan Davidson/O'Reilly Media, Inc

For a company that has sworn it’s a communications utility, and not a media company, Facebook sure does have some outstanding media talent on its Board of Directors.

Included, of course, is The Washington Post Company’s Don Graham, who is successfully bridging the print and digital generations.

And Now Reed Hastings of Netflix.

I’m wondering whether Mark Zuckerberg has changed his mind, or whether something different is going on.

And, as I’m thinking over what an increasingly social world means, I’m asking myself whether a communications utility is really any different from a media company.

The answer may be “no.”

Here’s why: Increasingly, the “distribution” part of media is being handled by lots of point distributors, each passing along to their own network, rather than by big companies that own dedicated equipment or spectrum like newspapers and broadcasters did.

And, as for content creation, we all know it’s gone from an oligarchy of anointed editorial sources to legions of content creators and commenters.

For Reed Hastings, he has a ton to learn from Zuckerberg about how to re-imagine content creation and distribution.  But Hastings, for his part, can help Zuckerberg learn how to rapidly build and scale a powerful business model that is increasingly playing in the world of content.

After all, no matter how Facebook likes to think of itself, it’s increasingly in the business of connecting audience to content.

So, that pretty much makes it a media company.

However the company defines itself, though, it’s clear to see that Facebook is playing a key role in digital media’s evolving model.  And it’s a smart of Mark Z. to learn from Hastings – who is one of the best in the world at innovating to serve today’s consumers in new and untold ways.

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